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Energy

Recently, Richard Trumka, the commissioner of the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), suggested regulating gas stoves. A growing body of research points to health and climate risks associated with the use of gas stoves. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Wind turbines, of the Block Island Wind Farm, tower over the water on October 14, 2016 off the shores of Block Island, Rhode Island. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

Biden's offshore wind plan could create thousands of jobs, but challenges remain

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In this Sept. 20, 2017 file photo, electricity poles and lines lie toppled on the road after Hurricane Maria hit the eastern region of the island in Humacao, Puerto Rico. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

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Carlos Giusti/AP

An interview with a federal official set off a culture war fight after he suggested regulators might put stricter scrutiny on gas cooking stoves due to health concerns. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

A display of Starbucks coffee pods at a Costco Warehouse in Pennsylvania. A recent article says using coffee pods might be better for the climate, but the science is far from settled. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar) Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

Yeah, actually, your plastic coffee pod may not be great for the climate

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Oil tankers are seen at the Sheskharis complex, part of Chernomortransneft JSC, a subsidiary of Transneft PJSC, in Novorossiysk, Russia, on Oct. 11. This is one of the largest facilities for oil and petroleum products in southern Russia. AP hide caption

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AP

Russia has amassed a shadow fleet to ship its oil around sanctions

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Sibley Street, along with other residential roads were closed due to flooding from recent rain storms resulting in high water levels in Willow Creek, in Folsom, California. Kenneth James/California Department of Water Resources hide caption

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Kenneth James/California Department of Water Resources

California's flooding reveals we're still building cities for the climate of the past

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Photographs by Becky Harlan/NPR; Matteo De Stefano/Getty Images; pixelfit/Getty Images; Collage by Becky Harlan/NPR

5 New Year's resolutions to reduce your carbon footprint

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Climate activists protest on the first day of the ExxonMobil trial outside the New York State Supreme Court building on Oct. 22, 2019, in New York City. ExxonMobil was found not guilty of misleading investors about how climate change would affect its finances. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

Exxon climate predictions were accurate decades ago. Still it sowed doubt

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The Emirati Minister of State and the CEO of Abu Dhabi's state-run Abu Dhabi National Oil Co. Sultan Ahmed al-Jaber speaks at the Abu Dhabi International Petroleum Exhibition & Conference in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, on Oct. 31, 2022. Kamran Jebreili/AP hide caption

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Kamran Jebreili/AP

For the first time in years, some Teslas will qualify for a $7,500 federal tax credit for new electric vehicles. But only some vehicles — and only some buyers — are eligible. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Daranda Hinkey, a member of People of Red Mountain, in Humboldt County, Nev., on July 2, 2022. The planned Thacker Pass lithium mine in northern Nevada, the largest known lithium deposit in the United States, has drawn concerns and protests from environmental groups, Native American tribes and local ranchers. Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images

Electric power lines are displayed at sunset in El Segundo, Calif., on Aug. 31, 2022. The FBI charged two men over attacks on Washington state's power grid that left thousands without power. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

The first nacelles onboard a sea energy "jack-up ship," ready for lifting into place on the Kentish Flats Offshore Wind Farm, off Whitstable, Kent, England. Chris Laurens/Construction Photography/ Avalon / Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Laurens/Construction Photography/ Avalon / Getty Images

Republican leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., speaks in Monongahela, Pa. on Sept. 23, 2022. McCarthy unveiled a campaign proposal titled "Commitment to America," which includes Republicans' climate change and energy policy proposals. Barry Reeger/AP hide caption

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Barry Reeger/AP

Republicans get a louder voice on climate change as they take over the House

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Transmission towers in Houston as the storm carrying frigid temperatures approached. The storm tested the reliability of the grid in Texas and across the country, but did not trigger a widespread power crisis. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Barges were stranded by low water levels along the Mississippi River in October, driving up shipping prices and threatening crop exports and fertilizer shipments. Scientists at the University of Memphis expect more dramatic swings in water levels on the river due to climate change. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Russian President Vladimir Putin delivers a speech during an expanded meeting of the Russian Defense Ministry Board at the National Defense Control Center in Moscow on Wednesday. Vadim Savitsky/Sputnik/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Vadim Savitsky/Sputnik/AFP via Getty Images

Russia's economy is still working but sanctions are starting to have an effect

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Climate activists from the group Letzte Generation (Last Generation) hold up commuter traffic on a Monday morning in Berlin by supergluing themselves to the road. Police unstick their hands using cooking oil and a pastry brush while irate drivers look on, stuck for more than an hour. Esme Nicholson/NPR hide caption

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Esme Nicholson/NPR