Planet Money Wanna see a trick? Give us any topic and we can tie it back to the economy. At Planet Money, we explore the forces that shape our lives and bring you along for the ride. Don't just understand the economy – understand the world.

Wanna go deeper? Subscribe to Planet Money+ and get sponsor-free episodes of Planet Money, The Indicator, and Planet Money Summer School. Plus access to bonus content. It's a new way to support the show you love. Learn more at plus.npr.org/planetmoney.

Planet Money

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Wanna see a trick? Give us any topic and we can tie it back to the economy. At Planet Money, we explore the forces that shape our lives and bring you along for the ride. Don't just understand the economy – understand the world.

Wanna go deeper? Subscribe to Planet Money+ and get sponsor-free episodes of Planet Money, The Indicator, and Planet Money Summer School. Plus access to bonus content. It's a new way to support the show you love. Learn more at plus.npr.org/planetmoney.

Most Recent Episodes

FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images

One economist's take on popular advice for saving, borrowing, and spending

This episode was first released as a bonus episode for Planet Money+ listeners last month. We're sharing it today for all listeners. To hear more episodes like this one and support NPR in the process, sign up for Planet Money+ at plus.npr.org.

One economist's take on popular advice for saving, borrowing, and spending

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Astrid Stawiarz/Getty Images for Housing Works

How the cookie became a monster

30 years ago, Lou Montulli set out to solve a fundamental problem with the internet, and accidentally created an entirely different one. On today's show, how the cookie went from an obscure piece of code designed to protect anonymity, to an online advertiser's dream, to a privacy advocate's nightmare.

How the cookie became a monster

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Sam Bankman-Fried and the spectacular fall of his crypto empire, FTX

Sam Bankman-Fried built a reputation as the one reliable crypto bro. But within the span of days, his empire came crashing down. What the rise and fall of crypto's 30-year-old elder statesman says about the story of crypto so far.

Sam Bankman-Fried and the spectacular fall of his crypto empire, FTX

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ALA members Alan Inouye, Barb Macikas, and Sari Feldman march towards the offices of a major publisher, Macmillan, in Manhattan. They carry boxes of petitions addressed to John Sargent, at the time Macmillan's CEO. The petitions protest a controversial policy on e-books in libraries. American Library Association/ALA hide caption

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American Library Association/ALA

The E-Book Wars

In 2019, a group of librarians (quietly) stormed the offices of a major publisher, Macmillan, to protest a controversial policy on e-books. On this show, how a tiny change - a book on a screen - threw an industry into war with itself.

The E-Book Wars

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Sarah Gonzalez/NPR

Peak Sand (classic)

Sand. It's in buildings, windows, your cell phone. But there isn't enough in the world for everyone. And that's created a dangerous black market.

Peak Sand (classic)

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Presidential candidate Alfred Landon greeting American President Franklin Delano Roosevelt prior to the 1936 presidential elections. Keystone/Getty Images hide caption

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Planet Money tries election polling

Polling is facing an existential crisis. Few people are answering the phone, and fewer people want to answer surveys. On today's show, we pick up the phones ourselves to find out how polling got to this place, and what the future of the poll looks like.

Planet Money tries election polling

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JADE GAO/AFP via Getty Images

Two Indicators shaking China's economy

Xi Jinping recently secured his third term as China's president – so we're looking at two shocks to the world's second-largest economy. First: How China's housing boom turned into a real estate crisis. Second: How the recent U.S. ban on selling advanced semiconductor chips to China could affect China's technology industry.

Two Indicators shaking China's economy

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Kaz Fantone/NPR

Planet Money Records Vol. 2: The Negotiation

We got our hands on the long-lost "Inflation" song, and now it's time to put it out into the world. So, we started a record label, and we're diving into the music business to try and make a hit.

Planet Money Records Vol. 2: The Negotiation

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Earnest Jackson recorded his song "Inflation" in 1975, and never released it. He never got to hear "Inflation" on the radio. That's about to change. Sarah Gonzalez/NPR hide caption

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Planet Money Records Vol. 1: Earnest Jackson

We try to start a real record label. Just to put one song out there. It's a song about inflation, recorded in 1975... and never released. Until now.

Planet Money Records Vol. 1: Earnest Jackson

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YURI CORTEZ/AFP via Getty Images

The high cost of a strong dollar

When it comes to international trade and finance, everyone pretty much speaks one language: the U.S. dollar. So when the Federal Reserve hikes interest rates and the dollar suddenly gets strong, it can cause huge headaches all over the world.

The high cost of a strong dollar

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